Tips for Getting Around in Mexico!

Mexican insurance,Mexican auto insurance,Mexico insurance

So, you’ve invested in top-quality Mexican auto insurance and are itching to get south of the border. If you plan on venturing well past the U.S.-Mexico border, though, it pays to brush up on a few basic tips for car travel in Mexico. After all, Mexico is a foreign country; different rules, laws and customs apply. After buying your Mexican car insurance at Mexican Insurance Store, you should read up on a few of the quirky things about driving around in this fascinating country; a few of the most notable ones are outlined below.

Make Good Use of Technology

In the past, the only way to get decent directions in Mexico was by investing in road maps. After spending money on Mexican auto insurance, though, you might want to save as much extra cash as possible. Happily, Mexico’s Secretariat of Communication and Transport recently created a convenient map tool online. Just visit their website to check it out. It should be able to save you quite a lot of time, and you’ll be able to map out specific routes. An English version is available, too, in case you’re not well-versed in Spanish.

Invest in Decent Maps and Decent Mexican Car Insurance 

Of course, online maps aren’t for everybody. Besides, you might want to have a little more freedom about where you’re going; in that case, mapping out a route beforehand may not work that well. Don’t waste your money on a North American road atlas – they just aren’t detailed enough. One of the best brands of maps to use for travel in Mexico is Guia Roji. Although these maps tend to be the priciest, their exceptional detail makes them more than worth it. After all, nothing can sideline a trip quite like getting hopelessly lost.

Be Careful at Night

When you’re in highly populated areas, it’s generally safe to travel at any time of the day or night. Even in rural areas, there’s not a lot to worry about; still, it’s better to be safe than sorry. If you’re going to be venturing into far-flung and remote parts of Mexico, you should be especially cautious when traveling after dark. In fact, you might want to avoid doing so altogether, if possible. It’s just one of those common sense things that will dramatically reduce your risk of encountering serious trouble south of the border. Remember, though, that Mexico is a mostly safe country – especially for those who use common sense and don’t take unnecessary risks. One of the most prevalent nightime risks is running into livestock in the middle of the highway. Ranches use much less barbed wire in Mexico, so animals commonly graze freely. Tips for Getting Around in Mexico and best Mexican Car insurance practices.

{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Jose Madras July 9, 2013 at 5:37 pm

I have experience in Mexico that Mexican people tend to dress conservatively, and if you would like to avoid unwanted attention, it’s a good idea to do likewise.


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